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Quake III Runs Fragtastically On a Droid [Smartphones]

Ten years ago, Quake III required a PC tower with some gaming cred. Today, all you need is a smartphone running Android 1.6 or later. And it's even a free download.

The hobby project of thunderbird2k, this video shows Quake III running pretty well on a the Motorola Droid—between 20 and 30fps—while allowing perks like multiplayer and customizable controls. (Also impressive: before the Quake was optimized for the platform, it still ran at about 22fps.) Given that the Droid doesn't have the fastest processor around, I'd be curious to see Quake III running on something like a Nexus One. In fact, maybe we should start using games to benchmark these phones, just as we do with beefy PC rigs.

Oh, and on a slightly related note...

Step-by-Step Guide to Rooting and Tethering a Nexus One [Tethering]

With the Nexus One, Google made it a little easier for modders and hackers to unlock and alter the phone. Boing Boing editor Cory Doctorow took the Cyanogen plunge for 3G tethering and open access, and explains the process in great detail.

Doctorow's post stems from his reading of the CyanogenMod Wiki tutorial, which does assume quite a bit about your technical and command line skills. Doctorow's pulled off the method he describes at his post twice, and both times come up with a Nexus One that simply pumps wireless access to a laptop when it's plugged in via USB (and the setting is switched in the Wireless & Networks section). While we've previously rounded up the range of Android tethering options, this how-to seems a bit more step-by-step and reassuring than most if you're looking to go with the free rooting method.

Take heed that, like with any "rooting" hack, you're taking your warranty, and your phone's stability, into your own hands. That said, if you've rooted your own Nexus and found an easier guide to doing so, link it up in the comments.

HTC Incredible (Or Supersonic?) Glimpsed On Video [Android]

Both the Incredible and Supersonic have had their leaky moments, and due to the similarities it's difficult to tell which model is shown here. I'm leaning towards the Incredible, which is meant to be the Verizon version of the Desire.

The video's in pretty poor quality, but you can see it's got the same ridged back as previous photos have shown—and while the back is red, I wouldn't read too much into that, as HTC always does colored parts for prototypes, favoring pretty basic colors for the launch. It's definitely a US-only device, shown running Verizon Wireless—but also lacks the chin that European Android phones from HTC always have.

When I had a briefing with HTC about the Legend and Desire, they told me every Android phone destined for the European market will have a chin, with US launches lacking one.

Check out the video for a shakycam look at the Incredible (or Supersonic), and let me know what you think. There seems to be a deeper bezel on the bottom half, like the Incredible—is that where the optical trackpad is? It's a bit hard to make out. [Phandroid]

Sony Ericsson X10

sony ericsson

HANNOVER, GERMANY - MARCH 02: A stand host holds a Sony Ericsson XPERIA X10 mobile phone that uses the Android operating system at the Deutsche Telekom stand at the CeBIT Technology Fair on March 2, 2010 in Hannover, Germany. CeBIT will be open to the public from March 2 through March 6.

Senior Vice President

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Nokia Executive Vice President Devices Kai Oistamo, right, and Senior Vice President and General Manager of the Software and Services Group for Intel Corporation Renee James during the "MeeGo" presentation the latest pretender in the increasingly congested operating system (OS) market at the Mobile World congress in Barcelona, Spain, Monday, Feb. 15, 2010. MeeGo is an open-source, Linux-based platform - just like Google's Android - combining the best of Nokia's Maemo and Intel's Moblin systems. It was unveiled at a press event on the first day of Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, the world's largest mobile phone trade show. The partnership between the world's largest computer chip maker and the world's largest mobile phone maker signals a direct challenge to rival OS systems from Microsoft, Google and Apple. The Mobile World Congress will be held from Feb. 15-18.

 

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